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Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
the economy will drive housing. >> what are you expecting elsewhere in terms of the regulatory environment? we're all wondering how this plays out, how the vogel rule plays out? what if it materializes and forces a separation from proprietary trading and plain vanilla deposit? >> that's not the volcker rule. >> nobody is doing proprietary trading. i always remind the public we had the widest, most transparent capital in the world. i'm not opposed to the intent of the volcker rule. the question is let's make sure when we finish we have the wi widest, deepest in the world. we serve 20,000 customers. give them great price, capital, advice, execution when they come to us because we give them a good price, just like walmart gives you a good price. we do a lot of it. that's a good thing. it keeps the cost of issuance and the cost of buying cheap. who does it keep cheap for? retirees, pensions, municipalities, korpgs. >> in terms of the federal reserve, how do you offset this difficulty in terms of making money in such a low rate environment? >> one of the funny things here, i keep hear that the bank
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ♪ >> pelley: a new study is finding that smoking is taking a much greater toll on women than it used to. according to research in today's "new england journal of medicine," back in the '60s, women who smoked had three times the risk of dying of lung cancer; now the risk is 25 times higher. one reason: women have been starting to smoke earlier, and they are smoking more. another threat to women is sexual abuse, and, according to the c.d.c., nearly one in five women has been raped. and in more than half of those cases, the rapist was an intimate partner. today, america's ob-gyns put out guidelines to help doctors deal without sexual abuse, and jon lapook is here to talk about that. >> they're talking about other forms of abuse including birth control sabotage. that's where a man interferes with a woman's contraception f
environment sn environment. >> you know, jackie just mentioned coach. you will bring us through some winners and sinners too. >> everyone is in on this trade. the last five years haven't been the best on the 50e cannot my but a little retail therapy helped investors along the way. since 2007, three of the top ten of the s&p 500 are consumer discretionary companies. also, making up nearly half of the 42 component that have doubled in that time period with those bar bell retail traids providing investors with the highest returns. discounters including ross stores, tjx, dollar tree and family dollar, all gaining a hundred percent or more since the october 2007 peak, but so too have ralph lauren and fossil on the high ends. on the dow, home depot come in as the top performer. wal-mart number four. so home depot and wal-mart are two that are up double digits. consumer discretionary groups, both leading the broader s&p 500. but the bulk of retail earners are yet to hit the tape. that could change everything. especially after a sneak peek. sweel if this trade gets to rally or not. >> nice winners a
, more nationalism and an economic environment that people are not totally pessimistic, but i think they expect to see more going forward. >> an thonenny jenkins from barclay's. good to see you. thanks for joining us. pick up with barclay's. what are the expectations of what they're going to do with that transformation and job cuts? but he clearly made the point. he said when we had strong revenue growth, the banking system as a whole didn't have to worry about cost. now we've got the right costs for the new environment we're in. and is this a cross to the board picture? >> definitely. banking ultimately is such for the underlying economy. so i think it doesn't take an economy to tell us that the next couple of years is going to be choppy and not the growth we've had for the last 20 years. banking has to go back to basics. fist, think about your revenue and cost base. here on the cost base, huge improvements. they've always been unmanaged because the revenue is growing so, you know, clearly matched to pay people twice as much as we have to. today, people working from i.t. to legal t
, the impact is stronger because they're less affected by the direct environment. >> are we enter ago harder market? which is to say can insurance companies start to raise premiums across the board? >> it varies a lot by line of bit in my country, but certainly post super storm sandy there will be hardening of rates. in the uk, though, with the rates going down, even though motor has been not that profitable -- >> why is that. >> because the competition is a pretty competitive environment. >> and we had changes in the motor race, though. we've had a big eu change on the agenda. >> yeah. >> we don't know how that's going to come out in the wash, do we? >> that changes things around. but in the short-term, it does mean that the markets are a little more volatile and it has been a sizable change. >> it's just unfortunate to some degree that these natural disasters which affect many people and are stressful events to live through then cause insurance premium toes rise, which sounds like that's what's happening in part of the u.s. >> it varies, but long-term insurers will look to make profit over
slowly. revenue is still growing rather slowly but still a pretty good environment. >> all right. here we go. the first of the earnings out from microsoft. we were expecting 75 cents. came in at 76 september, beating by a penny. the revenue was expected to be 21.53 billion. we got 21.46, so a little light on that. let's bring in our guests. max wolf from green press capital and david pearl next tomakers executive vice president and co-chief investment officer and jon fortt, anything to add on what we're seeing so far in the early statements of the microsoft report with stock up half a percent? >> yes, i've got a breakdown. >> 32.5, $1 billion on revenue is what we're getting on at&t right now and 44 cents for the eps is what we're getting for at&t as opposed to the expectation of 45, so it looks as though revenue was a little bit higher than exed, but looks as if the eps was one sent shorter than expected. we'll get back to microsoft right now and talk more about at&t earnings in just a second. >> don't you love it when they all come out at the same time. >> why can't you corporate guys c
outside of the normal in the office business environment. i met barry who runs real estate business. he joined my board. i bought his company call from davos. liz: there are deals at least the seeds are sown here? >> that's right. it creates personal relationships you know that create the relationships outside to make it work. liz: real estate business genesis of it was here has been huge for you guys. >> we started with frank. bought grub and el lis and brought the two together. very interest rates are great for commercial real estate. you can finance it cheaply. low interest rates is ails good for somebody. not good in the finance business but in the real estate business. liz: not good good for savers but good for that is right part of your business which brought in a lot of revenues. what is the most interesting conversation you've been a part of this time around? >> i met the t-shock i only word is the prime minister of ireland. what i thought was really interesting, he was very focused on business. he came here and his whole group is here to say we're open for business. we're focus
's your take on the regulatory environment. it seems the financial services over the last couple of decades has been riding a wave of positives. deregulation, globalization. going forward economies are looking inward and regulation is only getting tougher. >> a lot of those customers you're talking about are our biggest customers, a lot of those financial institutions. as long as they are going to be facing a head wind like that, you see a cut on volume, too. they have fewer strategies they're carrying out because of all the capital charges. what i heard yesterday that i think is the biggest issue is not the breadth of the regulation, that's to be expected after a crisis, the problem is the lack of consistency across different jurisdictions. we all run international companies now. if you start to have the different regimes in different markets, it's almost impossible to run a business that way. i think that's what we have to struggle through still. that's going to be a head wind for a while, i'm afraid. >> you've got a lot of regulators in europe, in the u.s., and they're all wan
still being a drog for your business? >> you know, it certainly doesn't help that the environment here has been very difficult. there's a huge swing in sentiment over the last three or four months. the sentiment is ahead of reality at this point. but in terms of the pick up of our business, it's been meaningful and the first three or four weeks of this year have started very, very strong. >> mario draghi was there talking about banking supervision, largest banks will be supervised from frankfurt in the ecb. how does that all impact your european union? >> well, the direct impact, of course, is limited in as much as our principal regulators and supervisors are in the u.s. of course, we do operate in all of these markets and, therefore, our local units do have supplies by local rules. that goes without saying. i think the key issue is that regulatory certainty and stability and a revival testament in europe benefits the sector, benefits the markets and certainly, therefore, will benefit us indirectly. but i would say the direct impact on what we do day-to-day is somewhat limited, of cour
are this low. perhaps he needs yields to be higher to say he was forced to do it. in this environment it's not going to happen. >> to bring you back, is there any sense at all that the full in borrowing cost for the spanish government is going to feed through into the wider economy? i spoke on friday to the economic affairs minister. he told me this is what's going to happen -- now that borrowing costs are down it will feed through to the real economy. do you think that's going to happen or not? >> i hope yes because really we need some new measures. and we need some help to keep on growing again, as i was saying before. really, the -- what's going to say prime minister to all the investors. we have problems in the banking system with banking as you tell before. we have problem with the bank, and we need to -- a solution, to solve. with the meeting this morning with the president of the euro group, mr. junker, not tell any news about how will be the new measure. we are waiting and waiting and hoping that the new measures could be really strong, could be really positive. almost -- almost
really see an environment here where it's really going to be a golden age for individual -- >> like which ones? >> stock selection and active managers. >> pin it down. give us some names. >> okay. well, we like the theme of oil by rail. trinity industries which makes cars that move rail. we like a derivative of the housing recovery briggs & stratton. we also like names where there is kind of secular growth opportunities and we see a shoe carnival as a small retailer regardless of what happens with the consumer we think they can really grow their store base and do it all organically. >> got it. >> shoes on a ship? >> shoe carnival. >> marc travis does the dow get back to the record high in the next week or next week or two and then what happens? >> you know, i would hesitate to annualize up 6% for january. you know, i'm like eric. i'm searching for equity securities where there is a discount between price and value. i would differ a little bit with eric in the small cap space. if you look at the russel 2000 it trades at 16 times operating income. the inverse of that is 6.25, which to me th
area, have appreciated the goals of our environment and climate change and doing everything that we can. i think the 80%, we're not going to be satisfied with that, spencer. we want 100% zero waste. this is where we're going. >> reporter: is that possible? >> i think it is. it is possible. >> reporter: san francisco residents sven eberlein and debra baida think it's possible, too. they are avid recyclers and composters, so much so that they produce almost no trash. baida lists what goes into the compost bin. >> we put wrappers from our butter, we put any meat or package, that kind of packaged paper food, soiled food wrappings, tissues, q-tips, paper napkins, which we don't have in our home. if those come in, those go there. soiled paper plates, milk cartons. >> i go to travel somewhere, and i'm, you know, i have, like, an apple and "where's the compost?" you know, and i have to throw it in the trash, and it kind of, you know, it just doesn't feel quite right, you know. >> reporter: but not all san franciscans are as enthusiastic as eberlein and baida. those who refuse to sort their garb
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> we are back with tonight's "outer circle" where we reach out to sources around the world. we go to south africa where the search is on for thousands of crocodiles near the botswana border. rising floodwaters were threatening about 15,000 crocs on a breeding farm. the owners opened the farm's gates to relieve pressure. more than half the crocs or the loose. maybe that's good because they're not going to be turned into handbags. robyn curnow is following the story. >> reporter: fair to say the people who are trying to round up the crocs are doing it carefully. we understand the recapturing the mostly taking place at nighttime because crocodiles eyes grow red when lights reflected into them. in this largely farming rural area, residents are being warned not to try and capture the crocodiles by grabbing hold of their ta
/win environment. certain states in the u.s. are doing a good job. those models whether they occur in canada, colorado, uk or israel or russia is what we're looking for. >> just to put this in some perspective for you. that company, cisco, has nearly $40 billion parked overseas, not here in the u.s. and chambers is pretty clear telling me he's not going to be investing a lot of that money in the united states unless policy changes here. so, two very different arguments but the same goal and the same conversation here all week. job creation. and i think the consensus here is that people really want clarity from washington on taxes and on spending. they want to see a long term deal. miguel? >> thank you, poppy harlow. 40 billion bucks, a lot. >>> if you're still on a high from the golden globes, brace yourself. hollywood is set for another round of it. the 19th annual screen actor guild awards are tonight honoring the best actors and actresses in tv and film. nischelle turner has more. >> reporter: in the hollywood honors where oscar's granddaddy, you might call the sag awards a sassy teenager
environment for stocks. stocks fell 10% to 15%. >> but still we've had people say that we can still do 4%. that that's just normal. that's just normalized -- >> over time. >> long-term yield. there would be some trepidation initially but that's not going to be something that would -- >> -- health environment -- >> >> we're going to get a lousy gdp number. >> but that should be backward looking. hopefully the market knows this is in the past, this isn't now. i think all the sentiments this week we have them from every country i think except japan business sentiment surveys coming out. that's a much more forward looking indicator. we're going to be watching that and housing. those are going to drive things as well as talking about earnings. we have 20% of the week. that's going to be a lot -- >> -- of the earnings season. now is when stocks usually begin to slide after a 4% rally in the two weeks before and al alcoa we could be hitting a rough patch as well. >> you've got a big lump money and you're like -- >> you're -- >> yeah, exactly. >> crazy like a fox. yeah. >> the minute we get 5% y
. a portfolio that does well in different environments. so much of the driver of many asset class returns is based on how events actually transpire relative to expectations. so there's a certain discounted growth rate in equities. there's a certain discounted growth rate, certain assets. you can look at what's priced in. and then what happens is, you need to have environments a quarter of your portfolio, in assets that do well, when growth is faster than expected. or, a quarter when it's slower than expected. a quarter when inflation is higher than expected and a quarter when inflation is lower than expected. so you need to create a good structured portfolio, then you can make your bets. but this is a whole conversation on how to invest. >> here's a question just about bets. you know, you're making the argument, and explaining the need to have a diversified portfolio. but most people have diversified portfolio follow the market. meaning, whatever the s&p 500 is ultimately you're going to be up or down, somewhere around there. you, and some of your peers consistently outperform the market.
to the broader manage crow environment, much more -- >> like what? >> the commodity environment we saw the last few years. certainly a better environment from a foreign exchange standpoint. multinational company earning profits. >> forex. and europe is better? >> europe, northern europe is pretty good. southern europe is still a challenge, because your previous guest would indicate. >> all right. you don't sell a lot of soap in certain countries over there. no, i'm kidding! i don't mean to -- i don't mean, you know, deodorant in one country in particular. let me think, anything else, jon, china? how's asia? >> asia is good. china is good. we grew high single digits in china. we expect that to accelerate as the year progresses. so generally our developing market business is very healthy. we grew 7% overall. 11% in the brick markets. over 20% in brazil and india. so that continues to be where a disproportionate amount of growth is coming. at the same time we're strengthening our develop market business which is starting to accelerate a little bit. >> thanks, john. hope to see you again next quart
ceo survey released this week, 52% saw no change from the current tepid economic environment. 28% saw decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery followed by slow downs of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa have made people weary of excessive optimism. things are stable, crises have been contained, there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we've turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos. no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, by the way. they just had their first year with $50 billion in revenues. underlying this caution, i believe, is a sense that growth that people had gotten used to, economic growth of the past that countries and companies had hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. the imf released a new report this week with growth numbers that are low. lower th
environment. 28% saw a decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year, when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery, followed by slowdowns of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa, have made people wary of excessive optimism. these are stable, crises have been contained. there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we have turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos this year, no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, they just had that their first year with $50 billion in revenue. it's a sense of growth that people have gotten used to, growth that companies have hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. growth numbers that are low, lower than they had projected only a few months ago. the world is coming to grips with the fact that the financial crisis might have ushered in not a few years, but a decades of slow growth. and we're not
% per year. all right? so higher rate environments don't necessarily mean, or not mutually exclusive of positive and constructive equity market returns. >> charles, i want to ask barry the same question after i ask you, but i would -- give me a number on where you think it would hurt? because i could see, i could see all the way up to 4.5% being construed as a positive. which is still such a low historical number for a ten-year, for whatever, i could see where that would help savers, it would help, you know, the return on some pension plans, and it would indicate economic growth much better than we have right now. it's something that japan wishes they had for the past 20 years, because it would at least indicate some economic activity. i can't even imagine it would be a headwind all the way up to 4.5% or 5% for equities. i don't know about the mortgage market. what do you think, charles? >> it's not just the absolute level, joe. >> but years from now, two, three years. we're going to get back there eventually, right? >> eventually i think we will. and i think if the path is a control
and what is the most of corn tissue of our time, the environment we live in. obviously we have to protect it. i think that is a possibility and probably something that may be effective. stuart: wouldn't do any good? >> if we could get bipartisan support, it could -- stuart: when it would lower carbon emissions in a miniscule, may be lower the temperature is your.1% over a longer period of time. it is just a fund of money. that is why -- that is what it is all about. >> those dollars would be used for other efforts to control and focus on changing climate. stuart: they would just fill government coffers with that the needed money. >> if that is the case they wouldn't be a good thing. stuart: when you are if in favor of carbon tax to raise money. >> i am not. i am in favor of it as a way of controlling, beginning to control global warming and giving resources to combat it. stuart: i want to bring you the answer to the quiz we brought you before the break. we asked who said this? i am quoting directly. i am so tired of hearing that the rich are not paying their fair share of taxes. yes we ar
record. connell: what are you expecting this year. it could be a completely different environment. many of those doomsday people are still expecting a mess, politically. after a while, you start to say, when will be the time that we do not get a last-minute deal? there is some percentage that fear that. is it reasonable? >> i think that is true. there certainly are some possibilities. the real fear has been kind of dissipating from the market. for example, we have lowered the downside scenario from 30% to 15%. as we look forward to the u.s. economy, there really are a lot of positives. housing is coming back very nicely. job growth has picked up a little bit. consumer confidence with the house prices and stock prices rising. that is coming back. that will be a big support to consumer spending. gas prices are not outrageous. i could give you a list of maybe 30 companies, a new factoring companies, that are looking to move their manufacturing back to the u.s. connell: we have seen a lot of that. you are right. bob, thank you. the third guest to be positive this hour on the housing market.
of the pressure of lawsuits, pressure of the regulatory environment, the cost, what should investors expect in terms of that pressure this year? can you say that's behind or still dealing with these things? >> we still work through lawsuits on mortgage-backed security side and other areas. but compared to what we have gone through the last few years, it is largely behind us. >> have you been surprised at the move in your stock as well as the interest in banks over the last year? >> our stock was up over 100% last year and that's, you know, i think was a performance reflecting in the capital and the uncertainties around capital levels and things like that, that came through during the year. but we got the best franchise in the business. we have great earnings power. it has been covered up and you see the last couple of quarters, by putting away a few of the things that happened in the past. we're very confident that as that comes through, the people see the value in this company. >> we'll be watching eagerly. thanks very much. >> thank you. >> we appreciate it. brian moynihan joining us. car
of this. and economy, like china, you do have real domestic -- you have a very adverse environment and you still can maintain some growth. >> is very different. the issues that are applicable, there's a lot of room in focusing on this becomes fundamentally important now. in ordered see that it is a commodity market. it would be to use the proceeds for decoupling. i think we tend to be a dedicated militia. we have new words and we repeat them. and then we realize that what we need to understand right now is wider than africa's interest that we are well organized and we are not decoupled in the short-term. >> okay, moving on to be other issues, the question is that essentially the eurozone has no growth policy and relevant time horizons. the question is how to get through the next few years. it was talked about, and if i understood it, she more or less said it does take years to get back to normal and that's just what you'll have to live with. and there isn't really much that one can do about it. what would your response be on this issue in the relatively near term? >> yes, he was quoting a
and cannot get a job is not the best environment in which to run a business. >> so that's interesting because this is a woman who is now one of the top positions at a public company. at aol. so then someone on the complete opposite side i talked to, john chambers, ceo of cisco, staunch republican, endorsed romney. he said they've got nearly $40 billion overseas. he has no intention of bringing it back to the u.s. unless policy changes. he said the place to do business. >> let me guess. >> what. >> then russia. he's making appoint with russia. he's making a point with russia, but canada. >> interesting. >> he just thinks if the policy doesn't change here, he's not going to bring the money to work here. you acquire companies where you're wanted clearly sending a message to the administration. i don't know if it's going to change everything. >> interesting to hear from different people. in one blaiplace such divergent views. good to see you, as always. >> you can see more interviews and all of our interviews from davos on cnn money.com. we'll be right back. >>> as the 43rd world economic forum w
them? >> yes, spencer, we actually do. not only does our department of the environment go out and do audits, we actually have auditors that go out there and make sure that we're all in compliance with the way we measure it, and using the state standards and the state process to do it. >> reporter: so there's no doubt in your mind that the 80% is real. >> oh, no doubt at all, no doubt at all in my mind. >> reporter: whatever the actual number is, recycling and composting don't come free. >> all of the services we provide are paid for by the customers whose material we're taking away. >> reporter: are they paying more in rates because of all this recycling and composting than they would otherwise? >> i would bet they're paying a little more. but if you compare rates in the bay area-- san francisco versus other communities-- we're right in the middle of the pack. and we're doing a lot more recycling than any other communities. >> reporter: residents currently pay about $28 a month for their trash bins; recycling and composting bins are free. but last month, recology requested a rate inc
the right environment is the most important. how we can create this environment today with this kind of unstability, we need political stability. we need peace. we have struggle between the palestinians and israelis and egypt. we have to talk about it and be very frank to see how we can get to the end of this. for this reason, yes, frankly speaking i'm not very optimistic about all today. if i ask anyone what you want me to talk to about, talk about democracy, freedom, transparency, governments, rulers. let us work for this and this is very important. >> let me ask --, let me ask someone who has worked with some of these institutions under the most ex-rd nary conditions. you have helped functioning institution in the west bank. you created an economy that created extraordinary growth over the last three years and you've done it under very adverse circumstances. so what would be your advice to people trying to build these institutions? >> thank you. honestly i continue to the effort help the institutions not just myself and to get ready for the emergence of fully independent and state
domestic market exclusively, it's a very, very different environment with awkward rent reviews, public sector costs are highly uncompetitive right across costs such as wages. other local authority charges on retailers in particular and those with large industrial premises within the country and we also have a domestic mortgage crisis with the banks. >> now, ryanair shares are under pressure today. you can see they're trading down by better than 2%, in fact, taking the sector down, too. ez-jet is one of the worst performers on the stoxx 600 today. ryanair is roughly flat over the past seven days, so marginally higher from where we were a week ago on the back of those comments. >>> we are going to head out to tokyo as toyota reclaims the crown from gm as the world's biggest carmaker. we'll get the latest from egypt as president morsi declares a month-long state of emergency. dozens of people have been killed over anti-government protests. we'll take a view on equities, too. the dow, as we said, is on pace for its best january since 1989. and, again, for that backdrop, blackrock is report
've got to get back to an environment where we have positive business investment. the easiest way to do it by the way is look at the tax side. ashley: yeah. >> we can still have a tax structure that is completely progressive but we have to continue to focus on structures that will enhance the ability for, for businesses to invest. ashley: that's right. >> moving tax rates, capital gains and dividend taxes from 15 to 24%, and taxing the rich is not a pro-growth policy. ashley: have to leave it right there. ed lazear, thanks so much for joining us. really appreciate it. >> thank you. tracy: especially when the rich keep moving. ashley: that's right. good point. tracy: follow the golfers. as we do every 15 minutes we check the markets now. nicole petallides on the floor of the stock exchange. good day for the drugmakers, huh, nicole? >> it is. look at some names on the move after earnings, latest drugs, clinical trials and mostly good news here, look at bristol-myers up 2 1/2% for bmy. they did beat street expectations. they're posting gains doing very well with that. they settled claims w
the environment we are seeing, the fact the we have tough earnings from apple waiting on the nasdaq which is a tech heavy composite index. we are seeing a winning day on wall street. phil flynn, the latest at the stock exchange in chicago. jeff: oil prices are rebounding from a big scare yesterday on the seaway pipeline. word that a glitch shut the pipeline down or reduced by half raised concerns that the flood in oklahoma would build back again. news today that it will be a short-term situation, they should get back to full capacity. 4,000 barrels a day by next week bringing the market back up. more oil down in the gulf of mexico is bullish. more in line with the global market to get the oil out the world, natural gas today, we have a bigger drawdown than expected, natural gas still down, a reversal on this cold weather. back to you. cheryl: we are looking at starbucks after dismal earnings reports, had come up with something to look at "after the bell" that might be decent, the real story with starbucks is stock over the past several months has gone up 20%. a lot of momentum to the upsi
. >> precisely. the challenge is when you have cognitive, how does human work? you sense the environment. you pick up a coffee cup. yes, they will actually be the capability to mimic, feel. so if you're out on the web, you can literally feel the fabric you're going to purchase. >> you have computers becoming more sensory in the application. touch, scent. >> smell. i think about smell. it's not just that your morning coffee is great. smell is imagine for a minute you sneeze. well, there's all sorts of chemicals there. what if one of the things you could detect was staff infection. literally if you sneeze your cell phone says oh by the way, you want to hick the doctor because you're going to be unbelievably sick. >> you're going to die. no hopefully you won't go that far. taste, also one of the things you can do. >> exactly. you're familiar with pandora, thumbs up thumbs down. imagine having dinner and you have your device sensor sitting there and you smell what it smells. it will learn enough about the chemistry what it is to actually suggest it. >> you're running down th
put that point together with a weak market environment in europe, that does mean margin pinches in europe. and europe, therefore, will be in our view a drag for some years to come. even with a lower oil price than the one you just mentioned. the big positive news about that is the oil and gas arbitrage. the difference between gas prices in the united states and oil price in the rest of the world, for that matter. that arbitrage is as high as it's ever been. that's advantage dow, and we're betting against that advantage by putting $4 billion into texas and louisiana to build against that arbitrage sustaining itself. >> where -- are you hiring, andrew, in the united states? we've got a jobs report out tomorrow and you mentioned that politics has slowed down the hiring for a lot of ceos. >> well, what we're doing is to manage our way through these rocky waters, more than ever we're portfolio managing so we're putting money where there is growth and good returns on capital, like plastics, like the hydro carbons point we just made, like agro sciences. they're we're hiring. on the bus
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)